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Freestyle 1/0


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#1 Roy McAvoy

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Posted 21 January 2020 - 04:06 AM

Just getting into tying more traditional/classic style flies for steelhead out here in the PNW, USA and stumbled across this forum. I don't have the materials for classic salmon flies as they are too expensive but I enjoy the challenge of tying. Below is my second attempt at a married wing fly. I didn't follow a pattern or recipe, just tied what fit my eye.

Feel free to critique, I'm here to learn.

Thanks.

Attached File  Screenshot_20200120-153144~3.png   1.87MB   76 downloads

Edited by Roy McAvoy, 21 January 2020 - 04:07 AM.


#2 Roy McAvoy

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 01:47 AM

Crickets....



#3 wd40

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 05:54 AM

Kindness abides.



#4 mfhughesjr

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 09:09 PM

Roy, Nice free style start. The tinsel reversal on the body isn't something that is often seen, but is interpretive and interesting. Because free styles are subjective, comments of classic style wouldn't make a lot of sense. I like the colour choice. As for comments, I'd have put on a denser butt. Tie in the ostrich herl close to the removal point, where the flues/barbules are denser and slightly shorter. The effect is not as wispy, and you can wind four good turns. Also, if you want to even up the wing tips, you could pluck/break the fibers with tweezers, or taper them with parallel scissor cuts. Michael

#5 Roy McAvoy

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Posted 26 January 2020 - 04:18 AM

Roy,Nice free style start. The tinsel reversal on the body isn't something that is often seen, but is interpretive and interesting. Because free styles are subjective, comments of classic style wouldn't make a lot of sense. I like the colour choice. As for comments, I'd have put on a denser butt. Tie in the ostrich herl close to the removal point, where the flues/barbules are denser and slightly shorter. The effect is not as wispy, and you can wind four good turns. Also, if you want to even up the wing tips, you could pluck/break the fibers with tweezers, or taper them with parallel scissor cuts.Michael

Thanks, Michael. Appreciate the feedback. The ostrich technique is odd to me...some books I've seen recommend taking two herls and wrapping. I'll try your method next!

#6 Bud Guidry

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Posted 26 January 2020 - 03:21 PM

Yes one herl, wrap them as close together as possible. The fly is quite nice for a beginner

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#7 mfhughesjr

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Posted 28 January 2020 - 01:06 AM

Roy, Ostrich herl fiberules are perpendicular to the shaft. The shape is like an "L". The vertical | is the fiberules. The horizontal _ is the shaft. You'll want to tie in so that when you wind, the horizontal _ slightly overlaps. That'll give you the tightest grouping of the vertical | fiberules around the hook shank. It'll make it easier to sweep the fiberules if you want the swept back look. Hope that made sense. For myself, I start my tie in close to where the fiber comes off the feather quill. That gives a Kelson like slightly forward angled herl butt. Michael