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Isonychia Dun - classic style dry


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#1 Ed M

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:30 PM

Guys -

 

Any and all thoughts and patterns welcomed.  Every year, after the green/yellow sulphurs, we get Isonychias up in the Catskills.  Fun hatch to fish b/c they're typically bigger bugs and the fish key in on them as a nice sized meal.

 

A google search and a quick check of Youtube gave me all kinds of Iso nymphs, parachutes, comparaduns, but nothing along the lines of a traditional dry.  I also searched similarly for Slate Drakes and MahoganyDuns as I know they're also referred to these ways but...  nothing useful.

 

Everyone seems to suggest a size 10 to a 14, gray wings (dyed mallard flank or matched quills, dun hackle points or even EP fibers), a dark dun, or chocolate dun hackle, a gray tail of some sort (CDL?) and then a dubbed body that's primarily a maroon color with blacks, brown, tans and olives mixed in - some suggest an olive or tan ribbing to the body, etc.  All this is great, and with these suggestions above I can tie about 634 different variations, not knowing one to be more effective than another.  That said, when I look at the mayflies themselves, they look to be dark brown/black & tan in color, and I'm not seeing the ever present/dominant maroon coloring, so...

 

Does anyone have a pattern they tie for their ISO dries that they swear by???

 

Thanks in advance, Ed



#2 scnye

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 07:38 PM

Well Ed, I am in no way an expert on trout things but I would look at all the suggestions and variations I could make and probably just tie on a #12 Adams and go fishing. Lol. Hopefully Dale or someone will be of more help to you.

 

 

  Sorry, all my trout flies are some sort of gray color

 

 

   Stephen



#3 ted patlen

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 08:15 PM

ed,

two mayfly patterns other than the mah. dun and slate drake from that area are, the white gloved howdy   a dated pattern

and the dun variant...but getting variant hackles nowadays is the tough part.

 

another good fly for the iso's is a big gray wulff...you'd be surprised

 

for a simple nymph/wet we like to use brown hackle peacock soft hackles...body about 5/8" to 3/4" long of the coppery colored peacock herl

a tuft of gray maribou for a tail, the nymph has prominent tails, hackle collar a darker reddish brown.   even a zugbug works .



#4 Ed M

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 08:23 PM

Stephen & Ted

 

Thanks - many's the time I've had no idea and thrown an Adams, a Wulff or for that matter some kind of Royal Coachman, and stumbled into dumb luck.  Honestly, its more tying is my therapy and I'm looking to tie up a few Isos to have to see how they do this year

 

Much appreciated guys

 

Ed



#5 scnye

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 08:51 PM

No problem, Ted was way more help than me. Some of the guys here are an absolute wealth of knowledge. Now,if you ever come to New Brunswick after salmon I could probably help you out.

 

 

 

 Stephen



#6 Charlie Vestal

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 12:53 AM

Knopp and Cormier in "Mayflies - An Angler's Study of Trout Water Ephemeroptera", give the following recipe for the Slate Drake dun

 

Hook:  Mustad 38941, 8-10.  (3x long hook)

Thread:  Dark gray

Tails:  Medium gray hackle fibers tied flared

Body:  Stripped peacock quill (modern dressings use dark gray polypropylene dubbing)

Wings:  Dark gray deer hair tied upright and divided

Hackle, rear:  Cream

Hackle, front: Dark brown

 

Charlie

 

The Mahogany Dun and White Gloved Howdy are listed as patterns for the spinner.


Chemical Engineering: Solving problems you didn't know you had, in ways you don't understand ......

#7 Ed M

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 02:59 AM

Charlie -

 

Thanks very much - I'm amazed that finding patterns on line isn't easier than it is - I'm gonna give it a try with the dubbed body (more durable) and will post what I come up with

 

Really appreciated,

 

Ed



#8 Dale A. Darling

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 04:28 PM

Hi Ed,

Sounds like you're on the right path. I'd agree with Stephen: Adams, maybe tied with a dun hen or deer hair wing, some brown or other colors blended into muskrat. Actually muskrat dubbed over dark brown thread might be neat when treated with floatant.
On the other hand, 437 different adults would work. Haha. I like the grey Wulff suggestion a lot! Maybe mix light dun and brown hackle.
Ideas that come to mind based on what you've described. I wonder what s BHP tied dry would do? Slate mallard quill wing? Yummy.

Have fun. Look forward to seeing your flies.
Dale "Fly fishing: a pleasantly addictive affliction"

My website here: http://www.riverforkpress.com
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#9 Classic Salmon Fly Tyer

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 05:51 PM

Ed,

 

Keeping it simple has always been my approach. I still have some of Elsie Darbee's dun variants and they are as easy as it gets.

 

Tail: Dark Dun

Body: Stripped Brown Hackle Quill (coated wit head cement)

Hackle: Over size Dark Dun (size 10 or 8 on a size 12 hook)

Thread: Olive

 

That's it!!

Cheers,

George


Petri Heil,

George

 

"I've spent many days on the golf course and said I should have gone fishing.

But I've NEVER been on a trout stream or Atlantic Salmon river and said I should have played golf." - Me


#10 Ed M

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 01:03 AM

OK, Guys -

 

Gave Charlie's Knopp & Cormier pattern a try.  Since the size limit means take the photo from distance and crop, I did my best to get the details to show - Two images - one profile and one top view to show the splayed tail.  Hackle is a cream and a chocolate dun (H Miner), wings are deer hair, body is dk gray superfine antron, tail is Coq de Leon

 

Thoughts and critique welcomed, I don't kid myself into believing that I'm Walt Dette's protege

 

Best,  Ed

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#11 Dale A. Darling

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 03:23 PM

Hi Ed,

Looks like a good fly. Very near a grey Wulff in a way. How many will you tie?
What's the hook?

Thanks.
Dale
Dale "Fly fishing: a pleasantly addictive affliction"

My website here: http://www.riverforkpress.com
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#12 Ed M

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 03:46 PM

Dale -

 

Thanks - the pattern called for a 3x long dry fly hook, and closest I had was a TMC2302 which is 2x long - I tied on that.  I'll probably do up 18 of these and 18 comparaduns.  I have the UV antron Iso colored dubbing, and I'll tie a few with that as well.  My experience with this hatch is that a traditional size 12 is the most prevalent within the hatch.  That will be most of them, but I will mix some 10's and some 14's as well

 

Best,



#13 Dale A. Darling

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 05:49 PM

Sounds good. Looked like that hook. I like it, too. You know the other pattern you couid try is an H&L Variant. That's a killer in the Rockies during green drake emergences, even though there's no real imitative quality of the natural other than size and shape. Which usually seems good enough. Haha.
If Geert joins you you'll need more flies. He loses all of them on snags. The fish are never in danger unless he falls in and one chokes laughing at his antics.
Dale "Fly fishing: a pleasantly addictive affliction"

My website here: http://www.riverforkpress.com
Voted 2017 sexiest fly tier of the year

#14 Ed M

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Posted 01 April 2017 - 10:47 PM

Dale -

 

Some day, I look forward to throwing Green Drakes to voracious trout during that fleeting hatch - what I know of etymology would struggle to fill a thimble, but I'm told that Green Drakes require a sandier, less rocky stream bottom than is typically found in my "home" waters up in the Catskills.  I carry a few in one of my boxes on a "just in case" basis, but I've never had cause to tie one on - I don't tie them as a result either.  If things change, I'll start tying them as I don't need much of excuse.

 

Back to it!  College hoops in the background - my vise in the foreground...

 

Ed



#15 Dale A. Darling

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 02:31 PM

What you guys call green drakes are different than the western insects, which are clingers that live in rocky environs with fast water.

By the way trout know less entomology than your thimble itself, but they know what to eat because it's right in front of them.

Good games last night. Go Gonzaga.
Dale "Fly fishing: a pleasantly addictive affliction"

My website here: http://www.riverforkpress.com
Voted 2017 sexiest fly tier of the year

#16 scnye

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 02:48 PM

We have green drakes here also but they can be very spotty and some years not many at all. I always blamed it on a cold spring. I have however had great luck on a white wulff mushed flat as a coffin fly imitation. 

 

 

 

 

 

  Stephen



#17 ted patlen

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 03:48 PM

ed, the green drakes on the delaware system are pretty regular and one of the more prolific bugs during the time around father's day...big bug week

 

keep an eye out for the bugs on the jersey rivers and about a week later you find them on the main stem...

 

the time of emergence is always according to water temps but it has been one of the hatches that one can label as consistent.

 

the size of the bugs range from huge (body length's of about 3/4") to about 1/3"   then tend to get smaller the longer the hacth goes on...i have seen gr drakes as far up river on the east branch to shinhopple and up to the dam on the west branch.   

 

the western g drake looks to me like a giant bwo ...



#18 Dale A. Darling

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 06:20 PM

Green drakes in Colorado are very different from the Henrys Fork brand. To me neither is anything like a BWO though. Well, both are mayflies.

Haha Teddy.
Dale "Fly fishing: a pleasantly addictive affliction"

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#19 scnye

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 07:53 PM

Ours are big and a bright limey green color. About the only mayfly that I can identify. Everything else is brownish,greyish blackish. Entomology is not my thing.lol

 

 

 

 

  Stephen



#20 Ed M

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 02:43 PM

Ah, Father's Day - no excuse needed for a weekend away fishing...

 

Typically, I associate Father's Day with the end of March Browns, and the beginning of the larger green/yellow sulfurs - the orange ones are smaller and come on later in the year.  I keep looking for that mythic Green Drake hatch as there's a certain appeal (to 55 year old eyes) to throwing and site fishing big bugs.  When I've got a size 18 or smaller on, I might as well be nymphing, except, since I use an indicator, I can see more with a nymph than I can a size 18...  I'm up there basically every weekend from May until the water runs dry (sadly, last year, June 30th), and if I finally stumble on a green drake hatch, I'll advise

 

Ed