Jump to content

ClassicFlyTying.com Sponsors
Hand Made Salmon Hooks
Ronn Lucas, Sr.
www.ronnlucassr.com
(503)654-0466
[email protected]

Photo

Legality of importing vintage taxidermy.


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Henry Denson

Henry Denson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 82 posts

Posted 09 May 2018 - 10:44 PM

Earlier today I saw a Victorian taxidermy display for sale online that I am very interested in. The problem is, the mounts are in the U.K, and I am in the USA. While I believe the larger specimens are legal, there are a number of small ones I am more uncertain of. I think they are mostly some sort of hummingbird, but I am not sure. My main question is, is it legal to import these specimens? Would there be some sort of grandfather clause since they were collected in the 19th century? Id rather not advertise this auction for obvious reasons, but if anyone needs more information, I can PM them a link.

#2 Charlie Vestal

Charlie Vestal

    Lakewood, Colorado

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,405 posts

Posted 09 May 2018 - 11:38 PM

Check out the C.I.T.E.S. listings.  They'll tell you what's legal.  Any raptor (hawk, eagle, heron, ...) or song bird is clearly illegal in the U.S.

 

Charlie


Chemical Engineering: Solving problems you didn't know you had, in ways you don't understand ......

#3 Henry Denson

Henry Denson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 82 posts

Posted 09 May 2018 - 11:50 PM

The problem is that I do not know what species the little ones are.

#4 Henry Denson

Henry Denson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 82 posts

Posted 10 May 2018 - 12:06 AM

But I will check out C.I.T.E.S.

#5 manyfeathers

manyfeathers

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 53 posts

Posted 10 May 2018 - 12:09 AM

You will need to check the species status at CITES on the website is  https://cites.org/
You can always send them an email to [email protected] with specific questions.

Basically, this is how it works:
If a species is listed as CITES l protected, you can not ship the animals (or their parts) across international boundaries.
CITES ll species and parts can be shipped internationally with proper CITES permits & documentation.

vendors that sell feathers and animal parts usually do not comply, and customs tends to overlook most of the packages anyhow.

I couldn't tell you if an antique or vintage mount is CITES protected, or not. You may have to contact CITES for the info, or you can simply take your chances if the seller is willing to ship. 

I will tell you for a fact, that eBay tightened up the rules for listings of animal parts and taxidermy over the past couple years. Sellers are no longer permitted to sell feathers/parts/taxidermy of any CITES l listed species on eBay. It used to be OK within your country of residence, but they have since banned the sale of all CITES l completely on eBay. Sellers are permitted to sell feathers/parts/taxidermy of CITES ll, but are not permitted to ship them internationally anymore. eBay hooked up with an animal rights groups a couple years ago that helped write the rules & regulations. Also somewhere along the route, eBay has since partnered up with PETA to keep an eye on listings & photos to ID the species. They sometimes randomly do a hit and remove listings, including some that are perfectly legal. So it has become a crap shoot on eBay now that PETA is involved.





 



#6 Henry Denson

Henry Denson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 82 posts

Posted 10 May 2018 - 01:23 AM

I found here that there are exemptions for specimens that are pre-cites. (Near the bottom of the page) https://www.cites.org/eng/disc/how.php Are there any other such laws that may apply? I doubt any of the birds are on the US migratory bird treatise.

#7 manyfeathers

manyfeathers

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 53 posts

Posted 10 May 2018 - 03:48 AM

I found here that there are exemptions for specimens that are pre-cites. (Near the bottom of the page) https://www.cites.org/eng/disc/how.php

Good to know! Great research!



#8 Henry Denson

Henry Denson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 82 posts

Posted 10 May 2018 - 12:15 PM

Thank you!

#9 jgogg

jgogg

    Jim Goggans

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,170 posts

Posted 10 May 2018 - 12:49 PM

The other thing that would be easy enough to do would be to  ask the seller to keep the birds you don't want or are concerned about their CiTES status.  The display will likely need to be taken apart for packaging in any event.  If you want the display as a display, this won't work.  But if you are after some particular parts of the display, just have those birds shipped and let the owner keep the rest.  Or, arrange to send the rest to a tier that resides within the EU.  

 

While Victorian taxidermy displays should be exempt from shipping restrictions, they typically do not have paperwork and US customs is not noted for taking anyone's word for the age of those old displays even when it is obvious.

 

Do be cautious about the condition of the birds.  Many old displays have suffered damage over the past hundred or so years!  And even if the bugs and vermin have been kept at bay, the feathers can be pretty fragile just from age.


Darwin award winner of flytying

#10 Henry Denson

Henry Denson

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 82 posts

Posted 10 May 2018 - 01:14 PM

Thank you. I may contact the seller to see if they have or can obtain proof of the age of the item. Unfortunately, most of the birds I want are cites listed. If it would help for you (or anyone else) to see the items, just let me know and I can PM it to you.