Jump to content

ClassicFlyTying.com Sponsors
Hand Made Salmon Hooks
Ronn Lucas, Sr.
www.ronnlucassr.com
(503)654-0466
[email protected]

Photo

My first attempt on a wally wing mayfly


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Joe Raven

Joe Raven

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts

Posted 22 October 2014 - 10:11 PM

Hi. First of all I just want to say that I am simply amazed of the amount of skillful flytiers on this forum. I've been a member here for a while, but this is my first submission regarded flytying. I choose a style/technique which I have longed for to try for quite some time; a wally wing mayfly. 
I'm quite pleased with the outcome, though this was just an experiment. Looking forward to try it out with my South Bend 359 9' rod.

 

Attached File  20141022_221143.jpg   89.17K   216 downloads

 

Attached File  20141022_224008.jpg   75.34K   200 downloads

 

Thanks, -Joe Raven


   Stillwater runs deep  


#2 Charlie Vestal

Charlie Vestal

    Lakewood, Colorado

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,405 posts

Posted 22 October 2014 - 10:16 PM

Joe,

 

Nicely done.  You may find that the stiff leading edge of the wing causes the fly to act like a propeller when you cast it.

 

I'm not sure why you called it a wally wing.  That's not what they are known as in Colorado.

 

Charlie


Chemical Engineering: Solving problems you didn't know you had, in ways you don't understand ......

#3 Joe Raven

Joe Raven

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts

Posted 22 October 2014 - 10:35 PM

Joe,

 

Nicely done.  You may find that the stiff leading edge of the wing causes the fly to act like a propeller when you cast it.

 

I'm not sure why you called it a wally wing.  That's not what they are known as in Colorado.

 

Charlie

Thank you very much Charlie. 

 

I suspected it would do just that, I have had the same problem with some of my old spent moth imitations. The only thing that can prevent it from happening is a thick and stiff leader... which is by far not my cup of tea. hehe..

 

Oh, I did not know that, what is it called in Colorado? I discovered this technique in a youtube video a while ago where a guy ties a very similar fly he calls a wally wing spent spinner, only big difference is that he adds a strip of foam between the wings to make them "spent".

 

-Joe Raven 


   Stillwater runs deep  


#4 Charlie Vestal

Charlie Vestal

    Lakewood, Colorado

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,405 posts

Posted 23 October 2014 - 02:37 AM

Joe,

 

I first saw these tied by Bob Churchill, a local tier, who called them Wonder Wings. 

 

Charlie


Chemical Engineering: Solving problems you didn't know you had, in ways you don't understand ......

#5 arkle

arkle

    arkle

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,468 posts

Posted 23 October 2014 - 10:10 AM

There's a difference between both "Wally Wings" & "Wonder Wings", there's a video of Jens Pilgaard doing the Wallywing on youtube, I think the version you're showing is the Wonderwing.



#6 Joe Raven

Joe Raven

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts

Posted 23 October 2014 - 10:20 AM

I thought that wonder wings was when you kept the whole stem and both sides of the feather. Like I did with cdc feathers on this spent spinner imitation in the picture below. Although I have seen both names being used for both of these techniques.

 

The wing that Mr. Pilgaard is showing in his video is called an origami wing, I think. Origami wing is when you use the stem of the feather all the way around the edge of the wing, they are some very nice and realistic type of wings. (Never tried it myself though). If you see the videos listed on the side when you watch Pilgards origami wing video you see a video by SMHAEN that shows you how to tie a wally wing spent spinner, this is where I learn the wally wing technique. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I am new on this forum and I'm not interested in coiming off like a know-it-all, I'm still learning.       

 

 

dsc_0312-kopi1.jpg?w=584

 

Thanks, -Joe Raven


   Stillwater runs deep  


#7 Isonychia

Isonychia

    John McCoy, Huntington, West Virginia, USA

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,656 posts

Posted 23 October 2014 - 04:34 PM

Regardless whether it's a Wally wing or a Wonder wing, yours is very nicely done, especially for a first effort. Thanks for posting it!

 

John


Offending the sensibilities of discerning trout since 1955


#8 arkle

arkle

    arkle

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,468 posts

Posted 23 October 2014 - 06:20 PM

I did not mean to decry your excellent efforts Joe & was working from memory, rather than checking up 1st, so it's "smacked wrist's" for me on that score.  I imagine, that there are plenty of youtube clips for these methods & possibly other centre quill wing types as well.



#9 Dale A. Darling

Dale A. Darling

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,138 posts

Posted 23 October 2014 - 09:35 PM

I'm with John Joe.
Thanks for your contribution and welcome aboard!
I recall tying similar wings for awhile in the early 1990's. Does that sound about right Chuck?
Used the flies some. But they didn't quite take for me for some reason, although I recall a few in my boxes that still got tied on and fooled trout now and again if Chuck didn't throw rocks on my riding trout.
Keep posting and commenting.
Dale
Dale "Fly fishing: a pleasantly addictive affliction"

My website here: http://www.riverforkpress.com
Voted 2017 sexiest fly tier of the year

#10 Joe Raven

Joe Raven

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts

Posted 23 October 2014 - 10:50 PM

Arkle,

 

Don't worry about it. I once called arctic char for redfish for a whole conversation with a Finnish fisherman who I met in Reisa-river. Note; I'm from Norway and do not speak the Finnish language, so the conversation was in English.

 

“Writers fish for the right words like fishermen fish for, um, whatever those aquatic creatures with fins and gills are called.”  -Jarod Kintz 

 

 

Dale, 

Thank you very much. I too think that these types of wings are more aesthetic and not so much practical. I have used some wonder-wing (stoneflies and caddis) flies lately and after about catching about ten-fifteen trouts the wing was significantly shredded.

Wally wings does seem to have a few weaknesses, like the wing acting like a propeller while casting and being very fragile to sharp trout teeth. What is your opinion/experience regarding this?

 

-Joe Raven


   Stillwater runs deep  


#11 Dale A. Darling

Dale A. Darling

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,138 posts

Posted 24 October 2014 - 02:07 PM

Flies fall apart. Thank goodness: we can keep tying more. Over the years I've decided that after two trout I change flies. What more does the fly have to prove? It worked. I love typo and trying new stuff, working on presentation, which seems most important anyway.
It's a lot about our own style - how, when, where and what. The why question is stupid. Why do we fish? It's either like asking why we breathe or just another meaningless why question.
Fishing is fun. Tying is fun. Robert Traver found the right words, more or less, in saying fishing was equally unimportant with other pursuits but lots more fun.
Tie and share. Stories are good, as are quotes!
Thanks!
Dale "Fly fishing: a pleasantly addictive affliction"

My website here: http://www.riverforkpress.com
Voted 2017 sexiest fly tier of the year

#12 Dale A. Darling

Dale A. Darling

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,138 posts

Posted 24 October 2014 - 02:08 PM

Tying and trying. Stupid smartass phone
Dale "Fly fishing: a pleasantly addictive affliction"

My website here: http://www.riverforkpress.com
Voted 2017 sexiest fly tier of the year

#13 Joe Raven

Joe Raven

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts

Posted 24 October 2014 - 11:20 PM

Dale, 

 

I agree, the most exciting part of tying imitations is to see how the fish reacts to them. Of course if I just want to catch fish I'll probably put a size 12-14 parachute with poly wing at the end of my tippet... it never fails. But nothing beats the feeling of conquer a nice trout on a pretty fly. Flytyers who don't like to expiriment and challenge themself are just trying to be economic... imo.

My answear to why I fish would probably be something like that. To me it's not about catching the most or the biggest fish, it's about being part of the moment and to be in one with the surroundings, the intellectual game between a man and a fish before it rises and takes the fly. I fish for those moments when it all somehow works out right. It's a zen state of mind that neither meditation, golf, or even drugs can ever give me. Ps: I have never tried golf, I swear. hahaha

 

Feel like I started to become a little bit deep there at the end so I finished with a bad joke. Sorry for my bad english, It's been a long day and I should have been in bed a long time ago.

 

-Joe Raven


   Stillwater runs deep  


#14 Thebugman

Thebugman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,104 posts

Posted 03 February 2015 - 12:09 AM

nicely done.


Kenny


#15 jimmy10

jimmy10

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,549 posts

Posted 02 April 2015 - 06:20 PM

Hi Joe, a very good example of the Wally wing procedure, but i thought all you North American guys knew the originator of this style,! it was in fact a guy by the name of Wally Lutz,a Canadian tyer,who 1st showed this procedure around about 10 - 12 years ago as far as i know ,maybe even longer!! As for the tippet twist, well i found that with the wings being fairly fragile,this was brought to a minimum by the air passing thru the wings. So i look at it this way,if one fly catches one fish then it has done its job,as this little gem of a dry-fly lasts at most for 2 fish,then it becomes a nymph!! at least for me! Very nice example shown!!

 

    regards   Jimmy (from UK)