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J. Harrington Keene - A few from 1882


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11 replies to this topic

#1 mfhughesjr

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Posted 12 November 2019 - 05:47 PM

Another set of pages for those with an historical interest.  An article by J. Harrington Keene, published in the Boy's Own Paper in August 1882.  Enjoy!

 

Attached File  1882-08-05_Boys_Own_Paper_1_resized.jpg   201.41K   38 downloadsAttached File  1882-08-05_Boys_Own_Paper_2_resized.jpg   108.03K   37 downloadsAttached File  1882-08-12_Boys_Own_Paper_1_resized.jpg   376.09K   21 downloadsAttached File  1882-08-12_Boys_Own_Paper_2_resized.jpg   31.14K   17 downloads

 

Michael



#2 Flytyedryrepeat07

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 06:43 PM

That's cool that you could find those. Are you going to try to tie those fly's?



#3 mfhughesjr

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Posted 14 December 2019 - 12:41 AM

I've been tying and researching flies since the 1990s.  The Shannon, Goldfinch and Ondine were earlier flies, published in Ephemera (Fitzgibbon).  He wrote in Bell's Life before (and after) his own books were published.  Those books are available on-line through Google books, the Biodiversity Library, archive.org, hathitrust.org, and other sites.

 

As for tying the flies, I tied a couple Ondines many years ago.  The blue peacock was not easy to work with, and I used small green peacock feathers as subs for the trogon wraps.  They weren't the exact green -- lighter in shade and denser, now that I've compared them with a real feather -- but were iridescent.  I'll see if I can find the fly and post it.  Otherwise, time for another in the vise.

 

If you're interested in patterns and sources, I'll definitely be glad to help.

 

As for learning to tie, I and others here are always glad to take questions.  (There are also a couple sites and Facebook that are a little more active, though this was the first -- or one of the first.)

 

Michael



#4 Alex Hayes

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Posted 18 December 2019 - 03:42 AM

Love this old documentation. Also curious about the hooks in these illustrations. I'm not nearly as well versed in the history as you. The hooks look to have an Aberdeen bend. Were such hooks commonly used for salmon flies? Or is it just the illustration style making it appear more round?

"There is no must in art because art is free"

                                         -Wassily Kandinsky


#5 mfhughesjr

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Posted 18 December 2019 - 10:12 PM

Alex,
 
Glad you appreciate the old documentation. The illustrations / fly renditions which accompany this particular article are not the best quality. They are from 1882, and there were good bend and hook size plates prior to that year, and some high-quality color illustrations to follow.
 
Someone who is an authority on hooks can give you a much better answer. I can say that a variety of hooks were commonly used in period flies. There are many examples from old kits. (See Stuart's kits pictured on-line.) J. Harrington Keene's Practical Fisherman had come out in 1881, and he was capitalizing / promoting in the papers of the day. He gave six bends: Round, Kirby, Limerick, Sneck, Kendal and Sproat, as well as an illustration of the sizes of hooks. The 1876 edition of Francis' Book on Angling gives salmon bends as Limerick, Round or Carlisle, Sneck and Kirby. All were used for salmon flies, despite being subject to the limitations suggested of the bends by various authors, i.e. weakness, overly long shanks, "pouty" or off-angle points, etc. Interesting items to read!  Re Aberdeens versus Carlisles/Rounds, there were variations on gape, shank length, hardening and finish. Both were used for salmon.
 
When I have a little more time, I'll post the pages that I referenced above.
 
Michael
 


#6 mfhughesjr

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Posted 19 December 2019 - 12:54 AM

Here are the first two referenced pages.

 

Attached File  1881_JHK_Practical_Fisherman_p380.jpg   233.46K   15 downloadsAttached File  1881_JHK_Practical_Fisherman_p381.jpg   118.78K   13 downloads

 

Michael

 



#7 Alex Hayes

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Posted 19 December 2019 - 04:08 AM

Wonderful! Thank you for the explanation and the graphics, they are very helpful. Hooks have been something I never though a lot about from a historical perspective. I always used the common bends available from today's hookmakers and some antique stock, but I've been wondering what else was actually in use that may not be as popular among modern tiers due to the aesthetic not being as pleasing for show. I suppose I should start reading up! Thanks again, Michael.

"There is no must in art because art is free"

                                         -Wassily Kandinsky


#8 mfhughesjr

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Posted 19 December 2019 - 05:33 AM

You're welcome. I posted the hook making process from Wells Fly-Rods and Fly-Tackle on the other site, and am going to be posting some hook plates there. I also will see if I can find the image of some large old flies that I stripped and post the before and after shots. I took the hooks back to bare wire for refinishing. Michael

#9 dickinson

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 06:03 AM

This is very interesting, where can I find old documents about fishing?



#10 mfhughesjr

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 09:21 PM

I've been digging around public and educational institution libraries for 30-odd years, before all of the digital / on-line projects started.  Some items I have only in photocopy or microfilm printout, but quite a few items, including a lot of the volumes on salmon fly angling and dressing have now been digitized.  I posted the following links to electronic resources on another site:

 


Below are the links to some sites that provide on-line / downloadable books (in a variety of formats) or a search service for public libraries and educational institutions.

I verified the URLs on 11/30/2019. Feel free to PM with any others that you use, and I'll add them with accreditation.  Thanks!


 

Michael



#11 mfhughesjr

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Posted 20 December 2019 - 09:23 PM

If you'd like more information, or are interested in certain items, please PM me.

 

Michael



#12 permitcapt

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Posted 12 January 2020 - 10:42 PM

Another set of pages for those with an historical interest.  An article by J. Harrington Keene, published in the Boy's Own Paper in August 1882.  Enjoy!

 

attachicon.gif 1882-08-05_Boys_Own_Paper_1_resized.jpgattachicon.gif 1882-08-05_Boys_Own_Paper_2_resized.jpgattachicon.gif 1882-08-12_Boys_Own_Paper_1_resized.jpgattachicon.gif 1882-08-12_Boys_Own_Paper_2_resized.jpg

 

Michael

 

Here are the first two referenced pages.

 

attachicon.gif 1881_JHK_Practical_Fisherman_p380.jpgattachicon.gif 1881_JHK_Practical_Fisherman_p381.jpg

 

Michael

Yes, thank you for showing diagrams!