Jump to content

ClassicFlyTying.com Sponsors
Hand Made Salmon Hooks
Ronn Lucas, Sr.
www.ronnlucassr.com
(503)654-0466
[email protected]

Photo

What should I tie for my first classic?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Pelpaaa

Pelpaaa

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 06 February 2019 - 02:48 AM

Forgive me if this question has been asked as Im sure it has before. I would like some advice on what first fly I should tie. I am blow by the sheer beauty of the stunning flys on here,I need to learn. Where would be the best place to start?

#2 arkle

arkle

    arkle

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,451 posts

Posted 06 February 2019 - 08:01 AM

A lot depends on what hooks & materials you have in  stock at the moment, as the choice of these is almost as wide as the choice of flies. Generally the "old school" of thought, is to try & tie parts of the fly on reducing sizes of hook until they emulate what the style of a particular style of fly needs, before going onto the next stage, i.e. learn to tie the tip, tag, tail & then the butt, then when you're happy with them learn to tie a ribbed floss body.  after that a dubbed body in a single colour before going onto a multiple sectin dubbed body. etc. Ideally if you can post photo's of how you think you're proggressing, then we can see how your skills develop & help you along the way.

 

You don't say if you have any experience of tying or not, again if you have & can show us some photo's we can see which area's you may need help in & advise accordingly. There are some very good books available & also some top class videos, epecially from people like Davy McPhail, that are exactly the sort of one's I'd recomend you look at.

 

"By the inch, it's a synch, by the yard, it's damn hard & by the mile, it's vile" so take all it in easy stages & you'll have fun along the way as your skill set improves.



#3 Pelpaaa

Pelpaaa

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 06 February 2019 - 04:24 PM

Thank you for the reply. I watched a YouTube on Silver Doctor by Nick Mango last night and Tied up with what I had around. I need some present crests, coloured Turkey and the small feather that goes over the tail of the crests. I have most of the other materials. I only had 70 denier Danville, broke the thread a couple of time last night. What thread size is recommended?

Attached Files



#4 Troutmaddave

Troutmaddave

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 855 posts

Posted 06 February 2019 - 07:24 PM

Use the search and look for my early efforts. Search for tip/tag.

#5 jgogg

jgogg

    Jim Goggans

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,159 posts

Posted 06 February 2019 - 08:00 PM

I use UTC thread that is pretty heavy.  It is pretty near unbreakable.  But, the UTC70 is also pretty nearly unbreakable as well and is more typically sized for salmon fly tying..  For that matter, Semperfli Nano is hard to break.  I use that as well, for heads.  Both are widely available.  Keep in mind, however, that for traditional flies tied with traditional materials, it would be Pearsall's  gossamer silk you should seek.  Unfortunately, that also takes finesse to avoid breaking.


Darwin award winner of flytying

#6 Bud Guidry

Bud Guidry

    Ragin Cajun

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPip
  • 13,405 posts

Posted 12 February 2019 - 12:37 AM

Arkle said it well

RAmidbuck.GIF
MY FLY PATTERN DATABASE

 

FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT OF THE OFFICIAL CLASSICS PAGE SLACKERS CLUB
HONORARY WINNER OF THE 2011 BIGGEST SLACKER AWARD

http://flyfishline.com/art_gallery2.php

My mind belongs to this forum
My heart belongs to my family
My soul belongs to my flies


#7 Gordon van der Spuy

Gordon van der Spuy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 514 posts

Posted 14 February 2019 - 06:42 AM

Tie a Kelsons Green Highlander. Doesn't require weird and wonderful materials yet teaches the fundamentals of classic tying perfectly

Attached Files



#8 Gordeaux

Gordeaux

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,849 posts

Posted 26 March 2019 - 05:00 PM

I almost always pick a Ranger pattern to work with a person as a first salmon fly.  The seal fur body will cover a lot of sins under it.  A fly with a silk body is much more difficult for a beginner.  Much more care is needed to make for a smooth silk body.  Start with an easy one to build your confidence before attacking a more difficult pattern.  In other words don't let a Jock Scott your first fly.  That is  my opinion on this subject.  Start easy and you will find it much  easier on the wallet.  Salmon material is not cheap!



#9 Herlhead

Herlhead

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts

Posted Yesterday, 09:09 AM

Ranger. No doubt.



#10 ted patlen

ted patlen

    marstons mills, massachusetts....cape cod

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,088 posts

Posted Yesterday, 01:18 PM

You do not have to be so precise in the dressing when first attempting to dress these flies.  Material knowledge takes a rather long time.  That is, learning what is usable, not just what is high quality.   

 

But learning the hand skills to make them can be done using just about any standard materials.  practice and practice and practice.